Attractions information

Grand Palace Bangkok

The Grand Palace is the most spectacular place in Bangkok, so if you only see one thing whilst in the city, this is the place to see.Thai people respectfully refer to it as Phra Borommaharatchawang. It served as the official residence of the King of Thailand from the 18th -20th century.

The Grand Palace complex, construction of which began in 1782 during the reign of King Rama I, sits on the east bank of the Chao Phraya River and is surrounded by a defensive wall 1,900 metres in length, which encloses an area of 218,400 square metres. Within its walls, in times past, were the Thai war ministry, state departments, and even the mint.

Within the palace complex are several impressive buildings including Wat Phra Kaeo or the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, which contains the revered Emerald Buddha that dates back to the 14th century.

Thai Kings stopped living in the palace in the middle of the twentieth century, but the royal residence is still used by visiting dignitaries.

Important Information

A strict dress code applies here. The Grand Palace and The Temple of the Emerald Buddha is Thailand's most sacred site. Visitors must be properly dressed before being allowed entry to the temple. Men must wear long pants and shirts with sleeves. No tank tops or singlets. Women must be similarly modestly dressed. No see-through clothes or bare shoulders. No shorts or tights. Proper shoes must be worn. No flip flops.

Attractions information

Wat Phra Kaew Emerald Temple

Wat Phra Kaew is regarded as the most sacred Buddhist temple in Thailand and is within the grounds of the Grand Palace.Unlike other temples it does not contain living quarters for monks. Rather, it has only the highly decorated holy buildings, statues, and pagodas. Strict dress code applies here.

The construction of the temple started when King Rama I moved the capital from Thonburi to Bangkok in 1785. The main building is the central ubosoth, which houses the Emerald Buddha.

Legend holds that the statue originated in India, but it first surfaced in the vassal Kingdom of Cambodia and was given as a gift to the King of Ayutthaya in the 15th century 1434.

The image disappeared when Burmese raiders sacked Ayutthaya and the image was feared lost.

Important Information

A strict dress code applies here. The Grand Palace and The Temple of the Emerald Buddha is Thailand's most sacred site. Visitors must be properly dressed before being allowed entry to the temple. Men must wear long pants and shirts with sleeves. No tank tops or singlets. Women must be similarly modestly dressed. No see-through clothes or bare shoulders. No shorts or tights. Proper shoes must be worn. No flip flops.

Attractions information

Chao Phraya River

The Chao Phraya River is regarded as the bloodline of the Thai people. It has its origins in four rivers flowing from the northern region of the country, the Ping, Wang, Yom and Nan which meet at Pak Nam Pho in Nakhon Sawan Province. The Chao Phraya River is 370 kilometers long.

Much of Thai history can be traced along the banks of the Chao Phraya River, because in the early days Thai people settled along the river banks and only with the advent of roads in recent times have they ventured further away.

Today the Chao Phraya River remains the most important waterway for the people of central Thailand.

It is a working river, with daily commuter boats plying up and down from Nonthaburi to Sathorn covering 31 piers along the way.

Tug boats towing three or four barges laden with sand are frequently seen as they make their way to the various construction sites down river.

In the evening, as dusk gives way to night, many dinner cruise boats take their place on the river, going up as far as the Rama VIII bridge and downstream to the Rama IX bridge.

The Chao Phraya River is vibrantly interesting in the daytime and romantically beautiful at night.

Attractions information

Bangkok Noi Canals

Bangkok has often been called the Venice of East, but over time many of the canals in the city have been filled in to make roads, so it is nice that this part of the city has retained the charm of living along the banks of serene canals. Take a long-tail boat and explore the myriad waterways.

Bangkok Noi Canal flows in a horseshoe shape through the old Bangkok Noi community in the Thonburi area.

The community was established in the Ayutthaya Period and King Chai Racha Dhiraj (1534-1546) commanded the excavation of a waterway from Bangkok Noi Canal to Bangkok Yai Canal as a shortcut to facilitate transport and communications.

Along both banks of the Bangkok Noi Canal, visitors see places of cultural and historical significance. On a boat trip you can pass the Thonburi railway station and the Royal Barges Museum. The boat trip also takes in several major temples and traditional Thai houses with carved designs.

Although cargo boats now use the direct route along the Chao Phraya River, the lively Bangkok Noi Canal community still endures. It reflects a bygone Thai lifestyle, inextricably related with waterways, and a Thai identity handed down from generation to generation.

Attractions information

Wat Pho Reclining Buddha Temple

Wat Pho, located next to the Grand Palace, is the one of the largest & oldest temples in Bangkok and is home to more than one thousand Buddha images. The most impressive of which is the huge Reclining Buddha measuring 46 metres long & 15 metres high with mother of pearl inlaid in its eyes & feet.

Wat Phra Chetuphon Vimolmangklararm Rajwaramahaviharn is commonly known as Wat Pho and the temple complex consists of two walled compounds bisected by Soi Chetuphon running east-west.

The northern walled compound is where the Reclining Buddha and famed massage school for the blind are found. If you go for a massage make sure you ask for 'soft'!

The southern walled compound, Tukgawee, is a working Buddhist monastery with monks in residence and a school.

The principal Buddha image is "Phra Buddha Deva Patimakorn" in a gesture of seated Buddha on a three tiered pedestal called Phra Pang Smardhi (Lord Buddha in the posture of concentration), and some ashes of King Rama I are kept under the pedestal.

Made as part of Rama III's restoration, the Reclining Buddha is decorated with gold plating on his body and mother of pearl on his eyes and the soles of his feet. Each foot is 3 metres high & 5 metres long and displays 108 auspicious signs portraying natural scenes of both Indian and Chinese influences.

Bangkok Temples and Canals Tour (Code:1002)

Pick a day and people

THB  9,600.00

THB  10,800.00

THB  13,200.00

THB  16,700.00

THB  18,700.00

THB  20,900.00

THB  23,100.00

THB  25,600.00

THB  27,900.00

THB  37,400.00

THB  39,600.00

THB  41,800.00

This tour is not designed for cruise ship passengers. Exclusive cruise ship tours are available from Klong Toey Port and Laem Chabang Port.

Thailand has thousands of temples, but Wat Phra Kaew at the Grand Palace is the most important because it houses the Emerald Buddha. Behind is Wat Pho, which is the oldest temple in Bangkok with its Reclining Buddha. Across the river you can climb the steep steps of Wat Arun - Temple of Dawn.

Do you want your tailor-made tour?

A tailor-made tour is the best kind of independent travel itinerary, designed and arranged just for you and your needs.
All events and activities are part of your very personal, privately guided tour.
Just ask us and we will be happy to make your tour an unforgettable experience. We have been doing this for 25 years and the quality of tailor made tours has never changed.

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Why is a private tour a better choice?

With a private tour, you have the freedom to choose what you want to do and when you want to do it. There is much more room for flexibility and changes to your itinerary at every step of the way because you don't have to consider the needs of other travelers. The flexibility and freedom to make the most of your time is the reason why so many people choose to take a private tour rather than a group tour.

Tour Programme

08:00 - Pick-up from hotel

We'll pick you up from your hotel. Please wait in the lobby.Read More >

09:00 - Grand Palace Wat Phra Kaew

The Grand Palace incorporates Wat Phra Kaew or the Temple of the Emerald Buddha which is Thailand's most revered temple. Please dress accordingly.Read More >

11:30 - Lunch in Thai Restaurant

Lunch will be in a Thai restaurant beside the Chao Phraya River. Read More >

12:30 - Long-tail Boat Trip

Enjoy the long-tail boat trip on the river and into the canal system on the Thonburi side. And we will stop Wat Arun "the royal temple of King Rama II" or Temple of Dawn.Read More >

14:00 - Wat Pho Reclining Buddha

Wat Pho is considered Thailand's first university and houses the famous Reclining Buddha.Read More >

15:00 - Return to your Hotel

Drop off back at your hotel or elsewhere if you want to go shopping.

Important Information


A strict dress code applies here. The Grand Palace with The Temple of the Emerald Buddha is Thailand’s most sacred site. Visitors must be properly dressed before being allowed entry to the temple. Men must wear long pants and shirts with sleeves. No tank tops or singlets. Women must be similarly modestly dressed. No see-through clothes or bare shoulders. No shorts or tights. Proper shoes must be worn. No flip flops.

We’ll do Wat Trimit instead of Grand Palace.

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